Our Top 5 Posts of 2019

Here’s a quick look at our top 5 posts from 2019.

We took a look at how many views they got, how many times they were shared, and comments received. We always appreciate it when we hear how you’re keeping up with us on our website. We all lead such busy lives but it’s important to feel connected to your community and your food!

Plus we couldn’t resist a good end of the year countdown list!

5. The Uncertainty of Farm Life

Things don’t always go as planned, but you always have to keep a level head and do your best.

4. Crop Report (late) July

This one came at the end of July. We love the excitement at the market this time of year. So busy!

3. Crop Report (early) July

The first crop report in July  and starting to head into peak season, we posted what was out, what was new, and put this video clip of Sandi explaining why farming is so important.

2. How to Freeze 10 Ears of Corn

What really amazed us about this post wasn’t the response it got, but rather how many pounds of corn kernels came from just 10 ears

1.When Bad Things Happen to Great People

Re-read this post from Phillip and take perspective on the things that truly matter in life.

 

Happy holidays to everyone out there. We appreciate your friendship, kindness, business, and connection every day and we hope we never take any of that for granted. Everyone that visits with us is an integral part of this farm and raising our children. We are grateful and so excited to ring in the near year with all of you.

A decade is over and a new one is going to begin. We hope for the best for everyone and look forward to another great growing season.

 

 

The Uncertainty of Farm Life

Fisher Hill Farm

Every day is something new on the farm. You never quite know what’s in store for you. Go in with a strong monthly, weekly, or daily plan and those plans can change in the blink of an eye.

It could be anything, too. Truck breaks down, tractor gets stuck, unexpected rain storm washes you out, anything to throw you off your game suddenly can happen. You kind of start to expect the unexpected, but it doesn’t make it any less frustrating when you have to stop what you’re doing to take care of something that you weren’t prepared for.

We’ve always been farmers so we can’t speak from personal experience, but in talking with friends and family it doesn’t seem that much different from any other job out there! Things come up constantly and you are always having to find new ways to make it work.

Life really isn’t much different. Things come out of the blue to throw you off your game all the time. Could be something as simple as a child getting the flu or as serious as someone close to you getting seriously ill. Those things are game changers in one way or the other and there’s no real way you can prepare for something that you don’t ever expect.

All you can do is try and keep your cool, stay centered, and make smart informed decisions as much as possible. The other thing you can do is ask for help. Never feel bad about asking for help when you need it. Too often we try to tackle projects that are just beyond our scope of comprehension and it only makes us more frustrated which never helps to solve any problems.

This is all stemming from us losing water pressure the other day and finding out there was a massive leak that needed to be dug up. Turns out it was a pinhole leak in the plumbing. But, man can that be frustrating. We had to bring someone else in to fix everything up and get the water back on. Never ideal to stop during peak harvest season to fix something you didn’t expect. But that’s life, the uncertainty of farm life!

 

 

 

Crop Report: July 2019

Fisher Hill Farm - Local Sweet Corn 2

We like to put these out as often as we can to ensure that our customer base knows what they can expect to find on our tables at the market. This way you can plan ahead for your meal, pair our offerings with neighboring farms, or look up some recipes in advance to know what other ingredients you may need.

This past week we saw a lot of rain, which we needed, but it can sometimes put us a bit behind. Now that we’ve caught up and all the crops are watered we ready to go for another weekend!

Just as a reminder, we’re not just at weekend markets! You can find us almost every day of the week during the summer!

Fisher Hill Farm Summer Market Schedule

Fisher Hill Farm Summer Market Schedule

In other news, we’ve partnered again with Hearth and Cellar for another dinner on the farm where one of our barns is turned into a five star restaurant. If you haven’t been before then we recommend you join us this September 8th (which is actually Grandparents day!) right here on the farm. Tickets are still available but usually don’t last for very long. If you would like more information please click below:

Purchase tickets here. 

 

What you will find on our tables at market this coming weekend:

Bunched Beets

Spring Onions

Sweet Onions bunched with greens

String Beans

Scallions

Shallots

Swiss Chard

Kale (Red Russian, Curly)

Lettuce

Radishes

Zucchini and Summer Squash

Cucumbers

Basil

Sweet Corn

New Potatoes

Fresh Chicken

 

As always we look forward to seeing all of you at the market this weekend and it’s supposed to be nice weather, too.

 

 

Our Top 5 Quotes on Farming

In an interview over the winter, Sandi talked a little about the importance of farming and what it means to her personally. It’s a great quote and one that really could make sense to anyone and not just farmers.

But it got us thinking about other quotes about farming that have come up. Quotes that maybe you’ve heard someone reference or maybe ones that are new to you.

Farming is as difficult as it is rewarding. That duality makes it an interesting profession to talk to people about because it becomes polarizing. But it makes for good discussion, that’s for sure.

Sandi’s quote:

 

Top 5 farming Quotes

Counting down from five…

5. “Farming isn’t for everyone, but hay it’s in my jeans”. – Anonymous

Ok. We can admit that this one is a bit goofy, but we have a sense of humor too! While there are some tough days of farming there are some really great ones too and we like to smile through it all!

4. “Agriculture is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness.” – Thomas Jefferson

This is an excellent quote and one that maybe we have gotten a bit away from over the last few decades. Our business and our lives has moved really fast with technology and other advancements but every so often it’s nice to stop and remember where we all came from.

3. “The farmer has to be an optimist or he wouldn’t still be a farmer.” – Will Rogers

Going back to the first quote, we have a sense of humor. Some days it’s so important to stay positive and think of what good we can do in the future and not just the things that have gone wrong.

2. “We have neglected the truth that a good farmer is a craftsman of the highest order, a kind of artist.” – Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry is a writer and coming from an artist this quote resonates with us. We appreciate it very much.

1.“Agriculture is the most healthful, most useful and most noble employment of man.” – George Washington

Well said and something to keep in mind when your day isn’t going so well.

 

Cheers to all the farmers out there. And cheers to you all, no matter what you do!

 

 

 

St. Valentine’s Day was Not Just for Lovers

Have you noticed that the hours of daylight have been increasing?

December 21st is the shortest day with less than 9 hours of daylight. On January 21st this jumped to 9 hours 32 minutes and February 14th increased again to 10 hours 30 minutes. Doing the math, since December 21st we have gained 1 hour 30 minutes and these gains seem more noticeable each day.

The sun even feels much warmer when it decides to make an appearance. The combined longer daylight and warmer sun means it’s time to start planting again in the High Tunnel. Out with the old and in with the new.

This week we finished harvesting one of the beds of Asian Greens and began the process of replanting a new crop for early spring harvest.

We stagger the plantings so we can have a steady supply of greens throughout the spring. After we finished harvesting we used the broad fork to loosen the soil and then clear out the old plants and debris by hand. Just a simple tool that uses muscle to loosen and aerate the soil for the new crop. The goal is to loosen the soil but not disturb it too much and keep all the topsoil on the top layer.

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Now we are almost ready to plant, but there is one more important step.

We need to till the top 2-3 inches to smooth it out and make the perfect seed bed. Keep in mind we are planting very tiny seeds and they need the best conditions as possible. The tool for this is called the tilther and uses a cordless electric drill to power it. A very cool tool that is specifically designed for this purpose.

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Finally we can plant into that perfect seed bed.

I didn’t have to amend the soil for this planting because lettuce and radishes are not big feeders. Also, last fall we added compost to all the beds. For this job I use a little six row push seeder that does a pretty good job. It doesn’t singulate the seeds perfectly but for this job is serves the purpose.

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Half the bed is lettuce mix.

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Other half is red radishes.

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Here are the finished beds and all that is left is to cover them with row cover to keep them warm on the cooler nights.

They are not going to germinate very fast but once they get going they should be ready in early April. Also we are trying an experiment this year and we wrapped the outside walls of the tunnel in a reflective insulated wrap. The goal is the keep it warmer and reflect more of that stippled sunlight to the ground.

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Now I hope you have a new appreciation for St Valentine’s Day and we can’t wait to start harvesting the first new crops of 2019. Also new this week are micro greens and pea shoots. Be sure to stop by the market and give them a try.

Phillip