Top 5 Tips for Shopping the Rochester Public Market

Fisher Hill Farm - Rochester Public Market

The Rochester Public Market is known for being one of the best markets in the area. There are very few cities and states lucky enough to have a market as robust.

Every week at the market, there are always a few people who let us know that they have just started coming to the market regularly. Sometimes it’s their first time! It’s great to see people discovering a treasure of local goods and services right in their backyard.

But if you’ve never been to the market, or if it’s been years, here are a few tips that can help you navigate unfamiliar territory. It can be a little overwhelming and we know it! It can get pretty busy during peak hours, so if you’re not one for crowds then the earlier the better. Thursdays are usually a lot less busy and if you are near downtown at all for work or otherwise, it can be a productive shopping event. We’re there on Thursdays from June through October. Click here to see our full market schedule.

Here are our top 5 tips for shopping at the Rochester Public Market:

#1 – Parking

This is by the far the thing that we hear the most about the market. Parking is difficult. It is downtown and parking is always at a premium. There are 5 city owned lots for parking. The largest is between Scio and Union. The second largest is between Pennsylvania and Railroad.

The red outlines the 2 largest city owned parking lots associated with the market.

There are also 3 smaller lots. Here’s the information from the Rochester Public Market website on the location of all the lots and where to access:

https://www.cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket/

Another option is to park near by and bike in. If you can’t get there early (before 10am) to get a prime parking spot in one of the free lots this can be a great and healthy option. We are seeing more and more people do this recently. There are some paid for parking areas too.

#2 Hauling

Now you’ve made it there but what the heck can you do about carrying all your great stuff? There are some great cart options out there and some stores sell them locally. But the best option is a good back pack. It doesn’t have to be the latest and greatest, but just something comfortable that you won’t mind walking with. Bring a lunchbox inside with a cold pack in it for meats and maybe an extra bag in case you find a watermelon or pumpkin that you can’t live without.

Look for a “Day Trip” backpack that is meant for hiking. They have lots of compartments and are meant to be comfortable on your back with weight in it. People also refer to them as rucksacks. An outdoor store like REI has them, as does Walmart. Find something comfortable and then you won’t mind wearing it.

#3 Money

There is at least one cash machine that we know of, but most vendors accept a card. But just to be on the safe side, bring some cash with you in case the vendor doesn’t accept a card. We do with no minimum, but we can’t speak for all vendors. Prices are usually clearly marked on the baskets. Cash or charge there probably won’t be any breaks. You make one break you gotta break for em all!

#4 Vendors

A very typical question is “Which ones are farmers and which ones are wholesalers?” That can be a tricky one, but there are a few tell tale signs your dealing with a farmer.

-They have a logo. You see a logo, it’s probably a farm. They probably have ‘farm’ in the name. Maybe on T-Shirts or the side of the truck.

Fisher Hill Farm - Rochester NY
The crew at Fisher Hill Farm – Rochester NY

-They have dirt. Could be on their hands, shoes, the truck, the boxes… somewhere there is dirt. We grow stuff. It grows in dirt. It’s hard to get it off everything.

-They tell you. When all else fails…ASK! Farmers will tell you if they grew it or not, if it’s on consignment from another farm, or if they traded with a farm, or who’s farm it’s from. Just ask.

Get to know your farmer and your favorite stop at the market and follow them on social media. You’ll know what’s coming out and what’s in season and what other markets they’ll be at.

The wholesalers can have some great stuff and you shouldn’t count them out! But since we’re a local farm we like to see local farms get most of the business!

#5 Restrooms

There are public restrooms in the updated indoor B shed. It’s the main building with the Public Market sign on the front. There are also restrooms in the middle brick building as well. Some businesses may have restrooms but we can’t endorse whether they are open to the public or not. The best option is the B shed. The new bathrooms are updated and very nice. The staff keep them clean even on the busiest days. Thank you very much to the hard workers at the market.

These are probably the most common questions that come up. We hope your market experience is excellent. Getting the freshest local ingredients leads to the best meals.

Crop Report: Fall 2020

Many articles, blogs, and conversations start with the same thing this year….I can’t believe this year is almost over! It’s been such a tough year!

That is most certainly true. But one thing that didn’t change all that much is the fields. Rain and sun still came and we still had to weed. Now the fall is in full swing. Despite the pandemic, the crops have come in nicely for the fall and we’re excited to share them with you.

Noteworthy News

As we head into the winter months, Brighton Farmers Market will remain outdoors in the Brighton High School Parking lot into December. For more information please visit https://brightonfarmersmarket.org/

Turkey is available for Thanksgiving while supplies last. If you would like a fresh local turkey this year visit our turkey information page https://fisherhillfarm.com/thanksgiving-turkey/

Our partnership with Flour City Bread for online pre-order grocery pickup on Fridays will continue as long as there is demand. Check out the new Friday dinner options as well as some upcoming Thanksgiving items.

What You Will See on our Tables at Market

This week expect the following produce:

Beets with greens
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Celery
Leeks
Kale
Kohlrabi
Peppers
Potatoes
Rutabaga
Onions
Scallions
Sweet Potatoes
Swiss Chard
Turnips
Winter Squash

The CSA with Choice!

Fisher Hill Farmers Market

Fresh from the farm produce, poultry, and eggs for a fraction of the price at a grocery store. CSA’s are one of the best ways to not only fill your cupboards and refrigerator but also connect with your community and local farmers, like us!

We want you to get the most out of our CSA and so every month when you come to pick it up, we allow you to pick what you and your family are most likely to eat. Plus, every month a new crop comes in so it changes all the time and the variety is the absolute best part.

For a list of our crop availability every month so you know what to expect, visit our our CSA page here.

If you want to check out our online store you can do that here.

We want you to get the most out of your CSA and we don’t want to see you get something that you don’t like or won’t eat. Getting your CSA is a commitment and we always think that’s why people shy away from it. “How am I going to know what I want three months from now!” is a common response. We understand and that’s why we want to give you choice.

CSA’s are relatively new to the world. They were invented in Japan in 1965 and were called “teikei” or translated to “food with a farmer’s face”. The phenomenon didn’t reach the US until 1984 but wasn’t made popular until 1991 when Roxbury Farm started distributing at the Union Square Greenmarket. They are now common throughout the US and all of North America.

If you would like to learn more about the history of CSA’s please click here.

Questions or concerns? Do not hesitate to let us know. We are here to help!

Contact Fisher Hill Farm

OR

Shop Now!