The Dirt is Finally Flying: A Crop and Field Report

Fisher Hill Farm - Tractor at night in field

It has been a super busy stretch here at the farm. We’ve had a few consecutive days without any significant rain and the wheels have been turning.

Since last Thursday we have been going hard and nonstop. Thursday we transplanted broccoli, cabbage, kale, swiss chard, and beets. Also had time to fit in a 15th wedding anniversary dinner with my beautiful bride. Friday we transplanted more beets, pumpkins, planted fall ornamentals, did some discing to smooth out the recently plowed soil. Saturday after market I picked up huge rocks with the loader. Sunday I did more discing. Monday we laid down black and white plastic mulch. Tuesday we transplanted celeriac, scallions, fennel, eggplant, tomatoes.

Fisher Hill Farm - Eat Local
Fisher Hill Farm – Eat Local

We’re finally starting to see light at the end of the tunnel. The only big items left are peppers, sweet potatoes, and winter squash. It doesn’t sound like much but they are all really big plantings.

The weather this spring has really been a downer. All the rain kept the fields saturated and the cool weather slowed down the drying out. I feel lucky that we have been able to chip away at the early spring crops and they are looking OK.

Fisher Hill Farm - planting in the field
Fisher Hill Farm – planting in the field

The cooler weather crops are doing great (onions, kale, lettuce, radishes, etc). Unfortunately, the warmer weather crops are pretty slow to get going (summer squash, cucumbers, beans, etc). Everyone on the farm has been working hard and the market table should reflect that.

This week’s share is a combination of new spring crops and storage crops from last season. We have really dialed in how to store many different veggies through the winter and you’ll enjoy them.

Veggies:

Asparagus

Lettuce

Radish

Bok choy

Micro greens

Pea & sunflower shoots

Rhubarb

Scallions

Spinach

 

Storage Veggies:

Potatoes

Onions

Carrots

Parsnips

Sweet potatoes

Rutabaga

Turnips

Kohlrabi

Beets

We also will have fresh chicken, eggs, and duck eggs available too.

 

Here’s where to find us from now through October:
Monday, Thompson Hospital (Canandaigua), 2:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday, Victor Central Schools, 3:30pm-6pm
Wednesday, On-Farm pickup, 4:30pm-6:30pm
Thursday, Rochester Public Market 7am-12noon
Saturday, Rochester Public Market 6am-1pm
Sunday, Brighton Farmers Market, 8:30am-12:30pm

Fisher Hill Farm - Tractor at night in field
Fisher Hill Farm – Tractor at night in field

 

CSA Save the Dates….and more!

CSA Season is here already! It seems like just yesterday we were setting up our 2019 forms and getting things in order for the summer and here it is! 

If you didn’t get a CSA this year but you have some questions about it we’re here to help answer them. Don’t be afraid to ask away at any of our pickup locations. We hope that your interest means that you’ll go with a CSA next year.

For those of you who have gotten a CSA this year you will be receiving information via email about what will be available on our table as well as pick up spots and times. These are listed below for everyone’s convenience as well:

STARTING PICK UP DATES

Wednesday, June 5, On Farm 4:30pm-6:30pm

Thursday, June 6, Rochester Public Market 7am-12noon

Saturday, June 8, Rochester Public Market 6am-1pm

Sunday, June 9, Brighton Farmers Market 8:30am-12:30pm

Monday, June 10, Thompson Hospital 2:30pm-5:30pm

Tuesday, June 11, Victor Central School 3:30pm-6pm
(Early Childhood School/District Office)

If you are reading this blog and aren’t familiar with our CSA we have one with choice. CSA members come to their pickup location and get to choose what they take home with them. We do not pre-fill baskets or bags. We want you to love what you get and get what you love so you will use it. We never want our product to go to waste and you don’t want to pay for something that you don’t like or won’t use.

For more information click here: https://fisherhillfarm.com/csa/

For more information you can always keep tabs on our blog page. We try to update you as much as possible of what crops are coming up next and what other farm updates we have. We even share some of our favorite farmhouse recipes there too!

Check out our latest blogs:

https://fisherhillfarm.com/2019/04/13/crop-report-first-of-2019/

https://fisherhillfarm.com/2019/04/29/crop-report-onions-are-in-the-ground/

https://fisherhillfarm.com/2019/05/21/our-top-5-quotes-on-farming/

 

 

 

Sweet! An Easy Snack or Appetizer

Fisher Hill Farm - Sweet Potato Appetizer

There’s no doubt that a little humidity can make you lose your appetite. When you’re finally hungry enough to eat, the last thing you want is something hot. 

It was a little humid out today, maybe the first day we felt any humidity since the start of the warmer weather. Working outside and in the barn all day made for a hot one and even though it’s going to get way hotter, we just weren’t ready for it and it hit us like a ton of bricks.

When we need a quick cool snack we like pre-cooked and refrigerated sweet potatoes. They’re super easy to cook in the oven and they keep in the fridge for a week or more after being cooked.

You can just quickly salt them and eat them or go the next step which we did for our snack tonight. It took about two minutes to prepare and was delicious and nutritious.

Fisher Hill Farm - Sweet Potato Appetizer
Fisher Hill Farm – Sweet Potato Appetizer

Here’s our super simple recipe. This is a easy snack for adults and kids but could make a little appetizer for a dinner party with friends too.

What you’ll need:

4 precooked sweet potatoes (wash, prick them with a fork, wrap them in foil, and bake in the oven until soft)

1 cup walnut halves and pieces

4 Tbs dark honey (buckwheat honey is delicious!)

2 tsp kosher salt (or 3 tsp sea salt)

A few handfuls of chopped arugula or other favorite micro greens

What you’ll do:

Once the sweet potatoes have been cooked and cooled, cut them in half lengthwise and salt them. Place the walnuts on top and drizzle with the honey. The greens on top provide some color and a little bitterness to that sweet and salty.

Sometimes the simpler the better. We love quick and easy recipes like this one around here especially with our three girls! If you don’t have honey or don’t like it, you can always substitute with delicious New York State Maple Syrup.

Cheers!

 

 

Our Top 5 Quotes on Farming

In an interview over the winter, Sandi talked a little about the importance of farming and what it means to her personally. It’s a great quote and one that really could make sense to anyone and not just farmers.

But it got us thinking about other quotes about farming that have come up. Quotes that maybe you’ve heard someone reference or maybe ones that are new to you.

Farming is as difficult as it is rewarding. That duality makes it an interesting profession to talk to people about because it becomes polarizing. But it makes for good discussion, that’s for sure.

Sandi’s quote:

 

Top 5 farming Quotes

Counting down from five…

5. “Farming isn’t for everyone, but hay it’s in my jeans”. – Anonymous

Ok. We can admit that this one is a bit goofy, but we have a sense of humor too! While there are some tough days of farming there are some really great ones too and we like to smile through it all!

4. “Agriculture is our wisest pursuit, because it will in the end contribute most to real wealth, good morals, and happiness.” – Thomas Jefferson

This is an excellent quote and one that maybe we have gotten a bit away from over the last few decades. Our business and our lives has moved really fast with technology and other advancements but every so often it’s nice to stop and remember where we all came from.

3. “The farmer has to be an optimist or he wouldn’t still be a farmer.” – Will Rogers

Going back to the first quote, we have a sense of humor. Some days it’s so important to stay positive and think of what good we can do in the future and not just the things that have gone wrong.

2. “We have neglected the truth that a good farmer is a craftsman of the highest order, a kind of artist.” – Wendell Berry

Wendell Berry is a writer and coming from an artist this quote resonates with us. We appreciate it very much.

1.“Agriculture is the most healthful, most useful and most noble employment of man.” – George Washington

Well said and something to keep in mind when your day isn’t going so well.

 

Cheers to all the farmers out there. And cheers to you all, no matter what you do!

 

 

 

For the Love of Asparagus

Every year our first major crop that we bring to market is asparagus. It’s the first green that we see that’s from our fields and that’s edible and really is a beacon of spring and the warm weather to come.

We love asparagus. So many of our friends and customers do too and tell us when they get to the market and see it’s available! But what is asparagus?

Origin of Asparagus

Asparagus is actually a cousin of the onion and a member of the liliaceae family. So asparagus and Lilies are related! Just like lilies asparagus comes back up every year. It’s been consumed for over 2000 years and has its origins in Eastern Mediterranean countries but has also been traced back to Africa. It has been shown that ancient Egyptians actually cultivated it by archaeologists.

In ancient Greece, Hippocrates used asparagus to treat certain gastric issues in his patients. Asparagines in the plant are a diuretic and has been shown to be quite medicinal. It wasn’t until the 16th and 17th century until asparagus made its way to Europe and was served to royalty. By the 18th century asparagus made it to the local markets and was used commonly in culinary efforts in every day households.

It doesn’t last nearly long enough. Only a few weeks usually. But, it’s the start of the season and the beginning of so many great things to come in the next few weeks and even months. But if you like it as much as we do you can easily freeze it!

Freezing Asparagus

The easiest way to do it is to blanch the spears and then quickly cool them. Get some boiling water ready and get a bowl of ice water ready. Put your asparagus spears in the boiling water for three minutes (one pound of asparagus at a time and allow the water to reboil before the next batch) and then take out and cool off the in the water. Dry them off and put them in freezer bags! That’s it. Fresh tasting asparagus long into the summer!