How to Make Duck Confit

Confit refers to a method of cooking something in grease or sugar at low temperatures. Duck Confit is usually made with the legs and is cooked in duck fat as the grease. It’s kind of like frying, except the temperatures are lower and it causes the meat to become very tender instead of crisp.

It feels as if it is a fancy dish and one that should be served with a white linen table cloth. But that’s not true! It’s a simple dish to make, keeps in the fridge for a long time and is delicious. The key is getting a locally grown duck (wink, wink).

What is nice about this recipe is that you can break off little bits of it at a time throughout the week so you never have to spend a whole day in the kitchen. Duck Leg Confit reheats in the oven and does not dry out so you can serve it as your main dish with little effort before the actual meal.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

One whole Fisher Hill Farm Duck

Fresh Thyme

Kosher salt

Vegetable oil (or other oil)

A sharp knife

WHAT YOU’LL DO:

The first thing you need to do is break down the whole duck into parts. It sounds difficult if you’ve never done it before, but it’s not. The legs come off very easily and that’s what you need to make this dish. Here’s a video on how to break down a whole duck.

What’s important about breaking this duck down is SAVING THE FAT. You will use that fat in to confit the duck legs. Save it to the side and cook it down. In the video below that part is covered. It can be done in advance and is very easy.

(*Pro tip. After the duck fat is rendered you’re left with crispy pieces of duck fat that make an excellent snack. Soak them in Frank’s Red Hot and bake them in a hot oven.)

Once the duck legs of off coat them liberally with the kosher salt and place them stack on top of each other with some fresh thyme. Put that in the refrigerator for a few days to let it cure. Once you’ve done that, the next step is rinsing them off really good and patting them dry.

Here’s the video that shows the rest of the process.

One of the best parts of Duck Confit is the wings! They are delicious. We also love to eat this dish cold, as a quick lunch out of the fridge.

If you follow this recipe, you’re going to be left with the duck breasts. Those can be cooked up crispy skin style very easily and takes almost no prep work.

In other news, our CSA is currently open. If you would like to learn more about it just go to:

https://fisherhillfarm.com/csa/

The Holiday Countdown

What’s on your menu?

2020 is getting closer and closer to a close. Even if this year your holiday party will be smaller than in years past, and no matter what holiday you celebrate this time of year, it will be a great way to usher out one of the strangest years on record.

We would like to thank everyone for their interest in local food. The enthusiasm our shopper have had this year has been awesome, and at time, unbridled! Many people used this year to explore new recipes while they were stuck inside and we were able to learn so much from all of you. Thank you.

As the year comes to a close, we want to let everyone know some menu options available.

  1. Turkey – We have a limited supply of fresh turkey the will be ready for pick up starting 12/19. Follow the link below to put down your $20 deposit to guarantee a fresh turkey for your table. I WANT TO PLACE A DEPOSIT ON A TURKEY.
  2. Duck – They are frozen and will take about 2 days to thaw in the refrigerator. Sizes vary. If there is a specific size you would like us to bring to the market please let us know in advance by calling or messaging us. If we don’t respond we didn’t get your message. Don’t be afraid to message again. We want you to get what you like.
  3. Chicken – We always have a pretty good supply of chickens at the markets with us.
  4. Stewing Hens – Low and slow works best for these. We have posted recipes in the past to use them. No matter what recipe you use, your whole house will smell delicious!
  5. We also have eggs on hand as well, along with lots of winter storage veggies.

This is the perfect opportunity to make a TURDUCKEN!

Not sure what that is? It’s a chicken stuffed into a duck and then stuffed into a turkey. Here’s a video of the legendary John Madden ripping one apart on live national television with his bare hands:

Wondering where to find us?

Farm Pre-Order Pickup Hours:

Wednesday 3:00pm – 6:00pm

Pre-Order HERE!

Address: 6440 Fisher Hill Rd, Canandaigua, NY 14424

Rochester Public Market

Thursday 7am-1pm

Saturday 6am-2pm

Address: 280 Union St N, Rochester, NY 14609

Brighton Farmers Market 

Sunday 10am – 11:30am

Brighton High School Parking Lot

Home Delivery Via Flour City Bread (And Brighton Market!)

www.flourcitybread.com/collections/grocery

Can Fresh Green Beans Freeze without Blanching?

Without further ado let’s answer the question at hand. Nothing is worse than clicking on one of these articles to find that the question is buried somewhere deep in the text.

The short answer is YES!

Fresh green beans can be frozen without blanching and actually come out better. But there are limitations to what you can do with them after you freeze them. If you have frozen blanched green beans when they thaw back out they can be a little soggy. Freezing them without blanching helps this soggy problem out, but doesn’t completely solve it.

The process is simple enough. Snap the ends of your fresh green beans, give them a wash, dry them off, and then freeze them. We try to spread them out on a cookie sheet after they are dry and freeze them for 30 minutes before putting into freezer bags. This way they don’t stick together and you can take out just a few at a time if you needed to.

The limitations are that they don’t remain the raw crispness of a true fresh green bean. But they do retain more snap than canned beans or your average grocery store freezer aisle beans. We recommend using them in a casserole, soup, or another cooked dish.

We used ours for the classic side dish Green Bean Almondine! (pictured above) Here’s the recipe we followed.

What You’ll Need:

-About 1lb of Green beans

-1 large shallot clove

-1 large garlic clove

-1/2 cup almonds, crushed up a little

-2 T of butter

What You’ll Do:

Thaw out the beans in the fridge overnight. Toss them in a bowl with a dash of olive oil, salt and pepper and place them in a small baking dish. Chop the shallot and garlic and sprinkle over top. Place the almonds in a plastic bag and use a rolling pin to crush them up a bit. Place those on top of the beans. Chop up the 2 T of butter and put on top. In the oven covered for 35 minutes at 350 or until they sizzle and you have a perfect little dish!

If you didn’t save any green beans this year, don’t worry. We’re going to grow lots next year too. This is a great side dish for Thanksgiving dinner as well. If you need a turkey this year, we have some left.

Click here to learn more about our turkeys!

Thanksgiving Already?

We know what we’re thankful for this year. Do you?

Wow. It was strange to type the word ‘Thanksgiving’ up there. We can’t believe that this year is already coming into holiday season. Once the kids go back to school (well, for some..) it seems like a matter of minutes until you’re opening presents under the tree.

We’ve definitely had a strange year, as so many of us have. We went from the depths of winter thinking about the spring planting season to worrying about our friends and family to worrying about our farm. But the community pulled together and we were able to be a part of that. This year we’re thankful for our strong local community.

$20 today gets you a farm fresh turkey on Thanksgiving.

Having such a strong focus on local throughout the region allowed us to continue our operation and get food on plates. That’s what it’s about for us. We want to grow good food that people enjoy. We love what we do and we love seeing how the community responds. We’re thankful for our customers and they’re thankful that we can continue to grow food!

Local doesn’t stop for us when summer ends. We’ll have plenty of storage crops and are able to provide lots of veggies far into the winter. We also have eggs, chicken, and duck during the winter too. Keep your eye out for info on the duck! It’s limited!

Right now our focus is turkey. As odd as it feels to be planning for Thanksgiving already, it’s time. Our poults are in the barn and we’ve officially opened up our reserving turkey on our farm store. $20 today gets you a farm fresh turkey on Thanksgiving. We have organic turkey too. Either way, all our turkeys are fresh and local!

Click here to reserve your turkey!

It’s Almost Turkey Time: Is Thanksgiving Dinner Healthy?

It hasn’t gotten consistently chilly at night quite yet but as soon as it does it calls for some comfort food. The most comforting meal that we can possibly think about is Thanksgiving Dinner. Always a great day to spend time with family and of course, over eat. But is Thanksgiving dinner really that unhealthy?

The short answer is unfortunately, yes. It probably is. But it isn’t necessarily what we eat but how much. Plus, really hard to say no to delicious pies even after you’ve already eaten a few helpings. But what about the star of the show? How about turkey?

Corn Salsa Recipe - Fisher Hill Farm
Corn – Fisher Hill Farm

The question with turkey is always the same; white or dark meat? Which really comes down to whether or not you want to have a slice of turkey breast or leg. You might think that this is because of health, but in reality it’s more about taste, because health wise, there isn’t enough of a difference in calories or fat in the meat to make much of a difference.

Roasted Turkey Breast (Skin-On)
Calories: 160; Fat: 6g; Sat Fat: 2g; Unsat Fat: 2.5g; Protein: 24g; Sodium: 55mg

Roasted Turkey Breast (Skinless)
Calories: 130; Fat: 2g; Sat Fat: 0.5g; Unsat Fat: 1g; Protein: 26g; Sodium: 85mg

Roasted Turkey Leg (Skin-On)
Calories: 180; Fat: 8g; Sat Fat: 2.5g; Unsat Fat: 5g; Protein: 24g; Sodium: 65mg

Roasted Turkey Leg (Skinless)
Calories: 140; Fat: 3g; Sat Fat: 1g; Unsat Fat: 1.5g; Protein: 25g; Sodium: 70mg

Source: USDA

Where most of the unhealthy-ness of turkey comes from is the skin. So if you’re trying to watch out for fat than skip the skin. That being said its all unsaturated fats. So if you decide that crispy goodness is for you that day, you don’t have to feel guilty about deviating from the diet.

The start of fall squash harvest

We do have some friends that deep fry their turkey. We’ve tried that too and these is very little room left for doubt that it’s really fantastic. But we don’t have to tell you that it’s not very healthy to eat anything fried. Our turkeys are raised to be very tender and juicy after hitting the oven. Plus we feel like the deep frying process takes away from the taste of the turkey itself, which we think is awesome!

One thing to consider when choosing a bird this year: Read the label. Some store bought turkeys are injected with a sodium solution to improve and retain flavor after freezing. When you buy a turkey from us it never gets frozen. It goes right from farm to table. So if you have someone in the family that might be watching their sodium intake make sure to keep that in mind.

Let’s get back to the original question; is Thanksgiving dinner healthy. The over eating part probably isn’t, but if you are selecting local fresh ingredients to put on your table and the star of the show comes from us, chances are it’s really not that bad for you. As long as after dinner you don’t have eleven pieces of pumpkin pie. Maybe this year just have five.